What am I reading


Sharing articles and clips that caught my attention across a variety of topics.




How to Make the Gig Economy Work in HR


 

The advent of more flexible working and different types of workers has implications on HR.  The HR team needs to be ready to change to reflect the needs of the workforce and management.  While many areas of change are obvious, such as employment or service contracts, some are not so obvious such as changing how HR reportings KPI's to the business.

 

 

An article in Training Zone talks about some of the areas that are not so obvious that HR needs to potentially re-think to both manage gig workers but also to give leaders in the organisation the data they need to manage the operations.

 

 

Comments by Mary Sue Rogers


 

 

More » Posted on : 2018/09/06





Twelve Forces that will Radically Change how Organisations Work


 

The Boston Consulting Group (BCG) has recently completed research which identified 60 major trends driving radical change in organisations.  They grouped these into 12 primary forces or megatrends.  And grouped these under trends that are changing the demand for talent and trends changing the supply of talent.  The results of their research create some interesting points of view.

 

 

CHANGES IN THE DEMAND FOR TALENT

 

 

Six of the forces identified are having a profound effect on the demand for talent were categorize them into two groups:

 

 


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  • Technological and digital productivity: automation, big data and advanced analytics, and access to information and ideas

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  • Shifts in ways of generating business value: simplicity in complexity, agility and innovation, and new customer strategies


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CHANGES IN THE SUPPLY OF TALENT

 

 

The other six forces are changing the supply of talent.  These again were divided into two groups: - 

 

 


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  • Shifts in resource distribution: a new demographic mix, skill imbalances, and shifting geopolitical and economic power

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  • Changing workforce cultures and values: diversity and inclusion, individualism and entrepreneurship, and well-being and purpose


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Within the two major areas the trends that I found most interesting were: -

 

 

Demand for Talent

 

 

"New Customer Strategies. Boundaries between companies and consumers are fading as people, informed and enabled by the internet, become more aware and demanding. They want personalized offerings and will collaborate with companies to help develop the products and services they desire. Procter & Gamble, for example, is now getting information about the shelving of its products in major retail chains directly from individuals in the stores. The company works with Gigwalk, a startup with a network of more than 1 million paid “Gigwalkers,” who check up on product displays and availability. In this way, P&G can easily track its execution in retail stores and quickly make changes to improve performance. (Even as companies encourage customers to share information, they must protect the privacy and data of those customers.)"

 

 

Supply of Talent

 

 

"Individualism and Entrepreneurship. Independence is becoming the dominant motivator for a large section of the population, particularly for millennials (born from the early 1980s to the mid-1990s) and Gen-Zers (born in the mid- to late 1990s and after). These younger people tend to get bored doing the same kind of work for long stretches, and they are especially interested in independent careers. Empowered by digital platforms and ecosystems, many are choosing entrepreneurship and self-employment over traditional corporate employment."

 

 

The full article is long but well worth the time to read.

 

 

Comments by Mary Sue Rogers


 

 

More » Posted on : 2018/09/06





How Real Leaders Melt the Iceberg of Ignorance


 

This is one of those must-read articles.  The iceberg of ignorance has been around for awhile.  It originated in the late 1990's when a consultant named Sidney Hoshida produced a study called "The Iceberg of Ignorance" based on what he saw in the leadership of a Japanese car manufacturer.  Yoshida found that, even though 100% of front-line problems were known to the front-line employees, only 74% were known to team leaders, 9% to middle management and just 4% to top management.  

 

 

How can leaders melt the iceberg so they too can see the issues and challenges facing the company?  In this article from Corporate Rebels, the answer is "show humility".  Leaders who show humility by mixing with the front-line gain more status and influence than their peers who prefer to stay in their offices. Moreover, leaders can actively enhance their status by engaging in work below their pay grade.

 

 

There are several great stores or even case studies within the article - including a top chef that sweeps the streets in front of the restaurant through to show his staff that every job and activity within the business is very important. 

 

 

Comments by Mary Sue Rogers


 

 

More » Posted on : 2018/09/06





Ten Essential Strategic Insights


 

It is coming to the end of the Australian fiscal year and many organisations are focused on achieving their 2018 targets and setting new targets for the next fiscal year.  In a recent posting from MindShift reminded me of the Michael Porter strategic insights.  There are 10, listed below.  A good reminder as we go into planning for next fiscal year (in Australia) or mid-year review if you are on a January to December timeline.

 

 

Porter’s essential strategic insights are:

 

 

1. The granddaddy of all mistakes is competing to be the best, going down the same path as everybody else and thinking that somehow you can achieve better results.

 

 

2. Confusing marketing with strategy.

 

 

3. Overestimating strengths.

 

 

4. Getting the definition of the business wrong or getting the geographic scope wrong.

 

 

5. The Worst mistake: Not Having a Strategy at all.

 

 

6. Not addressing the hidden biases embedded in internal systems, organizational structures and decision-making processes.

 

 

7. Companies undermine their own strategies.

 

 

8. Strategy killers in the external environment.

 

 

9. If you listen to every customer and do what they want you to do, you can’t have a strategy.

 

 

10. Single-minded pursuit of shareholder value, measured over the short term, has been enormously destructive for strategy and value creation.

 

 

Comments by Mary Sue Rogers


 

 

More » Posted on : 2018/09/06





The Best, Worst, and Most Repetitive Emails of GDPR


 

Ok, so how many emails did you get before the 25th of May that were sent to update you on a privacy policy change?  Or to ask you to re-opt in to a newsletter?  Or to tell you that they really care about privacy so they are making easier to understand?  If you were like me, you got dozens and dozens.  

 

 

The writers at Co.Design wrote an interesting article describing the different techniques well-known companies used to tell you about their new and improved security policy.  They categorised the types of notifications sent out and attempted to correlate those with how much the companies truly did care about your privacy and adherence to GDPR.

 

 

The ones I liked best from the list were: -

 

 

Everlane (NOTE ann online clothing retailer in California)  

 

 

“The thing about privacy policies? Nobody reads them. In fact, most are intentionally written not to be read. With that in mind, we’ve updated ours to make it easier to understand. But since we know most of you probably aren’t clicking on this email (no judgment), here’s a breakdown of what’s new.”

 

 

The article is definitely worth a read.

 

 

Comments by Mary Sue Rogers


 

 

More » Posted on : 2018/09/06





How to Down Load the Data Google, Twitter and Others Have on Your


 

With GDPR and other data protection incidents and legislation, one of the first things you should know is what do the big social media players already know about you?  What does Google, Insta, Twitter, Facebook and Apple currently have on file about you and what can you do about it?

 

 

This article was written by FastCompany outlines step by step what you need to do to identify what data each of the social platforms is holding you.  The first step to prevention is understanding how big the challenge is with respect to your personal data and what you have already "given away".

 

 

Don't be scared be informed.

 

 

Comments by Mary Sue Rogers


 

 

More » Posted on : 2018/09/06





Ten Worse Excuses for Not Hiring a Women Director


 

The number of women on boards has improved over the last 50 years BUT it is still not at the level that is representative of the population or more importantly the profile of the customers that most organises serve.  The excuses given for why there are not more women on any given FTSE board are many, and in most cases sound like the 1960's versus almost 2020.  In a recent BBC article, a list of the ten worse excuses was published.  These included: -

 

 


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  • "I don't think women fit comfortably into the board environment"


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  • "There aren't that many women with the right credentials and depth of experience to sit on the board - the issues covered are extremely complex"


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  • "Most women don't want the hassle or pressure of sitting on a board"


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  • "Shareholders just aren't interested in the make-up of the board, so why should we be?"


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  • "My other board colleagues wouldn't want to appoint a woman on our board"


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  • "All the 'good' women have already been snapped up"


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  • "We have one woman already on the board, so we are done - it is someone else's turn"


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  • "There aren't any vacancies at the moment - if there were I would think about appointing a woman"


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  • "We need to build the pipeline from the bottom - there just aren't enough senior women in this sector"


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  • "I can't just appoint a woman because I want to"


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The full article is definitely worth a read.

 

 

Comments by Mary Sue Rogers


 

 

More » Posted on : 2018/09/06





The CV of the Future will tell Employers Who You Are - Not Just What You have Done.


 

Who is reading your CV when you applied for that role?  The fortunate candidate will have his or her resume read first by a human being; even then, the average hiring manager only spends six seconds (pdf) sizing up each candidate. More typically, a resume will first be read by an applicant tracking system or ATS, software that’s programmed to search for combinations of keywords—and to spit out resumes that don’t meet the criteria. For many large employers, the resume exists only to identify reasons to disqualify candidates and thin the applicant pool.

 

 

Assessments are starting to be more the norm - whether it is a full psychometric test or specific testing for attributes and skills that are specific to a role (e.g a sales position).   

 

 

And the really big question - is a CV still needed?  Or is there something else that says what you have done and how well you executed the requirements of the role.  Could everyone just have a secure LinkedIn account - and that would be it?  What about using blockchain?

 

 

Whatever the answer the changing world of AI, Robotics, Blockchain are changing what is a good CV.

 

 

A great article by Quartz at Work - one of my must reads as it tells the history of the humble CV through to what can happen in the future.  

 

 

Comments by Mary Sue Rogers


 

 

More » Posted on : 2018/09/06





Learning for the Deskless Workforce


 

As the workforce changes and the mix of employees within an organisation moves from full time permanent with a desk they call all their own to a world of home working, part-time, casual workers and other employee types that don't necessarily have the same office infrastructure for learning and development.   L&D professionals need to examine how learning is provided to all types of employees and look at new ways to ensure that the training is delivered in a manner appropriate for the employee type and his or her infrastructure.  

 

 

Chief Learning Officer recent article on the different learning delivery methods for those that don't have a permanent desk and PC might provide some inspiration.

 

 

Comments by Mary Sue Rogers


 

 

More » Posted on : 2018/09/06





Blockchain and the Future of HR


 

Blockchain can be a way for individuals to maintain their credentials in a way that they are authenticated and protected from tampering.  Blockchain might be the future mechanism that all of us use to put our CV's, work experience, University degrees and other qualifications to facilitate their use when we apply for a new job or seek to be appointed to a new governance position.  All HR professionals should do a primer on what is blockchain (and not to confuse it with Bitcoin).

 

 

This Workforce article is a very good starting point. It explains what blockchain is (in layman's language) and how it might be used in the future of HR.

 

 

Comments by Mary Sue Rogers

 

 

 


 

 

More » Posted on : 2018/09/06






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